More Health for Money, Not More Money for Health

20 April 2016
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As we enter a new era in financing global health and implementing the Sustainable Development Goals, there is work to be done around engaging multilateral and private actors, and producing quality outcomes research to guide best practices. These were some of the issues explored on April 13, 2016 at the CSIS Financing for Global Health roundtable discussion featuring Rabin Martin President & CEO Jeffrey L. Sturchio.

The panel followed a presentation to launch the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation’s (IHME) new report, Financing Global Health 2015: Development assistance steady on the path to new Global Goals by Dr. Christopher Murray, Director of IHME at the University of Washington, and Dr. Joseph Dieleman, Assistant Professor at IHME. The two discussed how donor funding has changed and explored the future of global health financing.

Chris Murray then joined the subsequent roundtable with Jeff Sturchio, as well as Dr. Jennifer Kates, Director, Global Health and HIV Policy at The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. J. Stephen Morrison, Senior Vice President and Director of the CSIS Global Health Policy Center, moderated the session. Panelists discussed aggregate trend lines in global health financing and the prospects of leveraging higher financial commitments from private and multilateral sources.

Jeff discussed private-public partnerships in global health, which he said have become a substantial portion of funding, yet the dialogue often ignores private sector involvement, when in fact we should be thinking about more ways to engage private companies systematically. Both Jenn Kates and Jeff expressed concern over the optimism surrounding the conversation on increased domestic resource mobilization, expressing that while per capita spending may be increasing, the speed and magnitude of such increases vary, and disparities still exist. Jeff said that attaining the financing for global health is a matter of reallocation, and of persuasion to facilitate that allocation, which, he said, will require a greater focus on the outcomes of global health initiatives to establish evidence for ways to move forward, “More health for money, not more money for health.”

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